4 Rare HTML Tags You Really Should Know

<cite>

All of us will be familiar with the <blockquote> tag, but did you know about <blockquote>’s little brother <cite>? <cite> allows you to define the text inside of the element as a reference. Typically the browser will render the text inside of the <cite> tag in italics, but this can be changed with a touch of CSS.

The <cite> tag is really useful for citing bibliographic and other site references. Here’s an example of how to use the cite tag in a paragraph:

David Allen’s breakthrough organization book Getting Things Done has taken the web by storm.

 

<acronym>

The <acronym> tag is a way to define or further explain a group of words. When you hover over text that has the <acronym> tag used, a box appears below with the text from the title tag. For example:

The microblogging site Twitter has recently struggled with downtimes.

The microblogging site  <acronym title="Founded in 2006"e> Twitter </acronyme> has recently struggled with downtimes.

<address>

The <address> tag is quite an obscure little tag, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t useful! As the name implies, <address> allows you to semantically markup addresses in HTML. The nifty little tag will also italicize all of the data within the brackets, though the style can easily be changed through simple CSS.

Glen Stansberry
1234 Web Dev Lane
Anywhere, USA
<address>Glen Stansberry 1234 Web Dev Lane Anywhere, USA</address>

<abbr>

The <abbr> tag is much akin to the <acronym> tag, except the <abbr> tag is only used to define abbreviated words. Just like <acronym>, you define a title within the tag. When a visitor hovers over the abbreviated text, the full definition appears below. The <abbr> tag is rarely used, but the benefits are many for screen readers, spellcheckers and search engines.

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club is my favorite album.

<abbr title="Sergeant">Sgt.</abbr> Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club is my favorite album.